cold sore stages

Cold Sore Stages: Easy Reference Guide
Cold sores are also sometimes called fever blisters and are a product of the herpes simplex 1 virus (HSV1). While cold sores are technically a type of herpes virus, the HSV2 virus is the one responsible for genital herpes; they are not the same virus. It is thought that upwards of 75% of the American populace possesses the herpes cold sore strain, many of whom have no idea they are carriers.
The virus normally appears on the lips but could also be located in the oral cavity, around the nose area, and even around the hands. The fever blister goes through different stages before it ultimately heals, and although there is research being done, there is currently no cure or vaccine for the condition (don’t confuse this with the genital herpes vaccine that is currently under development). The onset of cold sores could result from stress and anxiety, fatigue, diet, and in some cases too much direct exposure to sunlight.
cold sore stages
There are Several Distinct Cold Sore Stages
The initial stage of the sore happens when the inactive virus becomes active and migrates to the facial skin, typically developing on the lips. Before the sore becomes apparent you could experience a burning or tingling phenomenon at the location where the fever blister will ultimately arise. This particular phase may last a day or two and sometime longer.
The subsequent phase is sometimes accompanied with a slight headache with/or an increase in body temperature. The affected area might also feel warm; sometimes described as a “hot” sensation. At his stage the spot will probably be inflamed as the herpes simplex virus has entered cellular material on the lips and is actively copying. Discomfort might be more apparent and this is the ideal time for you apply petroleum jelly on the sore to help keep it moist. Keeping the sore moist prevent it from becoming further irritated and also prevents the sore from cracking which may cause even more pain.
During the next stage the blister continues to swell and ultimately ruptures. You need to be especially aware throughout this stage never to apply makeup or touch other parts of the face or body since the liquid from the eruption carries viruses which might easily be spread to other parts of your body or even to other people. Again, applying ice to the area will help minimize the discomfort during this stage of the cold sore.
Towards the end of the blister scabs are going to form. Even though the cold sores appear to be dried up and drained of fluid, the virus is still present and can be transmitted. Scabs may also be rather painful since they can frequently break: this why it is extremely important to keep the sore hydrated. (Keep in mind that ice is a simple and easily accessible technique to sooth discomfort.) The scab that forms will finally go away while new skin grows under it.
The area affected can then go back to its inactive stage. Although the cold sore appears to have completely healed, the herpes simplex virus still resides under cellular levels of skin. Throughout this stage you should definitely steer clear of variables that may aggravate the region and stimulate new sore creation. Be aware that the virus remains communicable even when it appears to be inactive.

cold sore stages

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