hip pain help

Help For Hip Pain – What Can I Do About Hip Pains Caused by Arthritis?
This is the question I asked myself 4 years ago when I began to find it painful walking up stairs. My right hip felt stiff and it hurt to put too much pressure on it. I found myself limping to alleviate the discomfort. However, not one to worry unduly about such things, I just tried to ignore the pain and carry on with my life. I was a physical education teacher for many years and have always enjoyed an active lifestyle, both in and out of work.
After a couple of months the pain hadn’t gotten any better, in fact it was getting worse. So I finally did the sensible thing and went to see my doctor. She sent me to have some x-rays, and after further examination I was told I had osteoarthritis. I have to admit this floored me. Ok, so I was 52 years old and not as fit as I used to be, but my immediate thought was “hey, that’s not fair! I’ve never been overweight, always tried to eat healthily and look after myself”. Of course, fairness has nothing to do with it, and I later learned that osteoarthritis is more common in people who have suffered some sort of trauma to the affected joint. I had fallen off a horse over 20 years previously and landed very badly on my right hip, whilst nothing was actually broken (or so I was told), it’s quite possible this precipitated my arthritis.
hip pain help
On explaining my condition, two words my doctor used stuck in my mind: “progressive” and “incurable.” These were definitely not in the top ten list of words I hoped to hear on the subject. The Initial treatment she advised included taking regular, non-impact exercise, like swimming (this was good as I’ve always loved it, and swim every week) and Tylenol for the pain. I was told that in the future surgical intervention might be necessary.
I like to take a proactive approach to life, but I left the doctor feeling like there wasn’t much I could do beyond what I was already doing (exercising regularly, but not overdoing it, and generally looking after myself). So, I started to read as much as I could about my condition. I read the about natural, and not so natural, supplements available and the dietary therapies some people swear by. I read articles written by chiropractors and physiotherapists. Having a keen interest in alternative and complimentary therapies, I also explored acupuncture and magnetic therapy. I spent months on my private research mission, and these are the four things I found work for me to reduce the pain and stiffness in my hip and help me to cope with my arthritis:
1. I take regular exercise. I like swimming best, it’s aerobic (if you put some effort into it!) and doesn’t over-stress your joints.
2. I take supplements containing cetyl myristoleate. Huh? I hear you say. Of the many supplements on the market, the most well known are probably glucosamine and chondroitin (often taken together). Of the two glucosamine is more widely accepted, in fact it’s recommended by the European League Against Rheumatism. I took glucosamine on its own for a while and did notice some benefits, but I found a supplement combining it with cetyl myristoleate worked even better at reducing the pain and stiffness.
3. I attend Tai Chi classes. I find this keeps me flexible and improves my balance — as well as being very relaxing.
4. I keep a positive attitude. I have found that there are many positive steps I can take to help myself and I have started to feel in control of my condition, rather than it controlling me.

hip pain help

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