stop smoking withdrawal

Stop Smoking – Withdrawal Symptoms and How to Handle Them

Why it is so difficult to stop smoking?
Nicotine produces a neuro-biological dependence and are formally classified as a medical diagnosis, in other words, a medical condition. Nicotine stimulates neuronal activity and releases various neurotransmitters in the brain. The regular intake of nicotine associated with smoking gradually creates a chemical change in the brain. If nicotine supplies stops the brain reacts with craving and different withdrawal phenomena. Even when you have finished the first difficult period after smoking cessation, it takes months, sometimes years before the urge to smoke signals from the brain ceases.
A strong evidence of nicotine addictive effect is the major difference between the number of smokers who want to try and stop and they who actually succeed. Studies show that a majority of smokers want to quit. Yet, few succeed. Many have tried to quit, but experienced withdrawal symptoms that were overpowering. Some people are afraid to even try because of these symptoms.
stop smoking withdrawal
Another factor that contributes to the difficulty to stop is nicotine stimulant effect. You feel refreshing, mood improves and you get feelings of pleasure or comfort. The effects are short-lived and after a few hours, dependent smokers need to have a new dose to avoid cravings.
Why do smoker suffer from withdrawal symptoms?
Nicotine stimulates the release of several transmitters (neurotransmitters) in the brain, including dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin and the body’s own morphine-like substances, endorphins. These substances stimulate the brain’s reward centres and centres for attention and alertness. During regular nicotine administration the nerve cells in these areas get used to nicotine so that nerve impulses and the balance between signal changes.
If nicotine is suspended like in smoking cessation, it will take several weeks before the activity returns to normal. During this time of severe chemical imbalance the smoker can experience various quit smoking symptoms, both physical and psychological symptoms. Difficulty breathing, irritability, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, restlessness, insomnia, decreased heart rate and increased appetite or weight gain are examples of common withdrawal symptoms.
Withdrawal symptoms are thus a consequence of the body’s adaptation to a prolonged drug abuse. A period of rehabilitation is required when the body gets used to “live” without nicotine. Withdrawal symptoms usually become apparent a few hours after the last cigarette and can last from two to four weeks. There are methods to fight the quit smoking withdrawal symptoms. Don’t let the withdrawal symptoms hold back your will to quit smoking.

stop smoking withdrawal

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